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Final call for male cyclists in the A1 and A2 category who race at national level and train at least 15 – 20 hours a week.  Arthur Dunne, Performance Nutritionist, is doing a PhD (ethical approval was granted from WIT) and is currently comparing the bone density and body composition between jockeys, cyclists and swimmers. Arthur is looking for males 18+ (ideally 18 – 35years old) who fit the criteria above to participate in a one off testing session lasting 30 – 40 minutes at the Racing Academy and High-Performance Centre, Kildare.


The session will consist of 

1. Measurement of height and body mass

2. Hydration test

3. DXA scan - DXA requires participants to lie still on a scanning table while a whole body (approximately 6 minutes), a lumbar spine (2 minutes 30 sec) and proximal femur (3 minutes) scan are performed as per manufacturer’s guidelines

4. 24-hour food recall 

5. Bone-specific physical activity questionnaire (BPAQ)



The benefit to athlete and support team

Participants will be provided with an individual report on their performance data, including body fat measurements, lean mass scores and bone markers.

The performance data can be used to prescribe an appropriate and personalised nutritional and /or exercise intervention with their relevant support team (i.e. team doctor, coach, nutritionist, strength and conditioning coach).

The information can inform daily training regimes and provide insight into known modifiable factors, including diet and strength and conditioning, thus improving fitness, reducing the risk of injury and illness, and enhancing performance.


Some new research has been published on the bones of elite cyclists if anyone is interested in reading more! 

https://twitter.com/JanWvanDijk/status/1410175169142919169


Final date for participation in this study is Saturday 24th July. Contact Arthur Dunne 087 6651542 for more details or if you’re interested in taking part in this study.